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Door Access Control & Security Entrance Integration Techniques

You are likely convinced that a physical security entrance is absolutely necessary in order to get the most out of your access control system and truly keep unwanted people out of your facility. Integration between door access control systems and security entrances can be a fine art; the perfect balance of functionality, space and aesthetics.

There are various types of access control systems available today, everything from bar code and QR code readers, to fingerprint and iris scanners, to traditional card readers and key pads. The size and shape of each individual device varies greatly based on both type and manufacturer. Let’s discuss some ways you can integrate your access control system with your security entrances.

Four Integration Techniques

All physical security entrances have a designated place for your access control device – optical turnstiles: under the cabinet top; full height turnstiles, security revolving doors and portals: mounted on the side post. Yet, based primarily on space and what you are trying to achieve, these designated mounting places may not fit your needs. Here are some alternative options:

  1. Top-mounted: For optical turnstiles, mounting an access control device on top of the cabinet is an integration Access Control Integration Techniques.jpgmethod that is most intuitive for the user because the reader is visible when approaching the lane. Organizations that utilize lift or elevator notification devices (destination dispatch) have also found that top mounting is a viable option. They tend to place the access control device in the designated area (under the top), and the elevator notification device either on the turnstile top, or on a custom pedestal (read on to learn more about this option).

  2. Panel Cut-outs: Another option for optical turnstiles, panel cut-outs are typically used due to space limitations on or under the top. This type of mounting can be used as the sole means of accessing the secure area, or in addition to the traditional, under-the-top mounting option (two-factor authentication). Some companies have even used the panel cut-out to mount a device that is used solely for visitor entry. While this option of mounting is aesthetically pleasing, (no big device on top of your turnstile), it does require user training because the reader is not always easily visible.

  3. Custom Pedestal: For entrances of all types, pedestals are a common way to mount an access control device. We’ve seen some basic, standard pedestal designs, but some manufacturers are working with the end user to develop a sleek pedestal that imitates the curves and design of the entrance itself – true integration at its finest.

  4. Interior-mounted: Security mantrap portals are a unique, high security entrance designed to protect the most sensitive of areas. This sophisticated portal can be equipped with a biometric post for an interior-mounted access control device. Often used in conjunction with an external, side post-mounted device, the interior biometric device allows organizations to achieve two-factor authentication.

Two-Factor and Multifactor Authentication

Large companies are implementing two-factor and multifactor authentication techniques at their facilities to decrease the possibility of an intruder infiltrating the building. According to LoginTC, two-factor authentication means, “an attacker needs to solve two fundamentally different problems, each in different dimensions, in order to compromise your identity.”

Utilization of two-factor or multifactor authentication typically involves the integration of two different access control devices for access through a single security entrance. This level of integration requires proper preparation and planning. There are, however, some all-in-one devices that can accept two or three authentications, e.g., a single Morpho Sigma device can accept any combination of a card reader, unique pin and/or fingerprint.

The fusion of your access control device and your security entrances shouldn’t be an afterthought, but an integral part of your building design from the very beginning. Speak to your security entrance manufacturer about the solution that will work the best for your organization.

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Amy Coulter

Written by Amy Coulter

Amy Coulter has been a member of the Marketing Department at Boon Edam since 2012.

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