Boon Edam Blog

Greg Schreiber

Greg Schreiber has been with the company a total of 15 years and currently is the Senior Vice President of Sales. Greg’s career spans over 20 years in the security entrance and door industry in a variety of sales management roles, including National Sales Manager for Boon Edam since 2007, after the acquisition of Tomsed Corporation. Greg has successfully steered the North American and Latin American sales teams to produce double-digit sales growth in each of the last 4 years. A native of Pittsburgh, Greg graduated from the University of Toledo with a degree in Business Administration and currently lives in Venetia, PA.


Recent Blogs

Risk Mitigation Strategy: The Science of Securing an Entrance

The problem with some employees is that they are too nice. They let people in behind them without thinking about it. Most of us are not raised to close a door in someone’s face, so we hold a door open for them, or we let them in behind us, especially if they have forgotten their credentials at home. Good manners, right? Yes, but not good security.

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Top 5 Reasons the C-Suite Deploys Security Entrances

Even though they’ve been around for decades, sales of security doors and turnstiles have increased markedly in the last several years. Some of the biggest companies on the planet are implementing them globally and tying them into their access control systems. Why now? What has changed?

Every organization faces a wide range of risks on a daily basis. Of all these various risks, there are five specific categories affected by access control, where the risks increase significantly when an unauthorized person has gained access into a controlled area. To manage any of these risks, you have a choice: you can choose to respond after the infiltration occurs or prevent infiltration from happening up front.

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4 'Gotchas' That Could Derail Your Security Entrance Upgrades

We’ve installed thousands of entry solutions, talked to end users all over the world and have developed a comprehensive process for choosing the right security entrance. That said, no process is perfect, and we’ve come to observe that certain organizations will consider some of the decision criteria quite well but leave out one or two factors. We call these the “gotchas,” and when forgetting or ignoring any one of the criteria, you can end up with a security entrance that doesn’t address the needs of your organization.

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Why Access Control Systems Will Never Be Enough to Protect Your Premises

Security systems have long been in the business of risk mitigation. In addition to controlling potentially perilous situations as they occur and dealing with them safely and efficiently, a security system and its operators need to be able to identify problem areas and use the systems at their disposal to prevent issues, when possible, before they even occur.

A major source of risk for any facility—large or small, new or established—are the entrances and exits. Every facility has at least one entrance and an access control system alone cannot effectively mitigate the risk of unauthorized entry. Many buildings will have a number of different areas in their floorplan that require varying levels of security at the entrances to that area, even if it’s as simple as locking an office before the weekend.

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3 Variables that Impair the Effectiveness of "DIY" Mantrap Vestibules

We recently met with a Fortune 100 company who had constructed their own mantrap style security vestibule at the entrance to a data center. They figured it would save them money, but it ended up being ineffective and a constant drain on resources.

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6 Main Benefits of Security Turnstiles at Recreational Centers

When a campus recreation center experiences large numbers of people entering at once, reception staff can become overwhelmed as they work to manage the entrance and handle other administrative tasks. This creates the risk of unauthorized entry into the facility by non-members and “friends of friends.” Today, rec centers around the country are deploying security turnstiles, integrated with membership management systems, to provide reliable entrance security as well as data collection. Let’s explore some of the benefits of this new model...

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It’s Time to Integrate Security Entrances into Your Profit Model

As an integrator, you’re used to having a predictable revenue model selling security products to end users. Your portfolio likely contains products like door hardware, access control systems, card access readers and software, video surveillance cameras, VMS and many other examples that help customers deploy a complete security solution.

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Effectively Preventing Workplace Violence and its Costly Impacts

For many years, we've been hearing about workplace violence, but where do things stand in 2017? What are the impacts of workplace violence on the organization and what are some ways to proactively prevent such violence from happening before it’s too late? Let’s take a look at the potential impacts of workplace violence and how it can be mitigated.

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Security Entrances Protect Your Bottom Line and More

Executives must handle large security decisions that affect the entire organization – and these choices are rarely easy.

One reason is that there are often competing goals – balancing security vs. convenience, or allocating budget to one priority area vs. another. To make it worse, these decisions – for example, on how to deal with potential security risks – can rely on data that the organization is not tracking.

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Best Active Shooter Policy: Security Revolving Doors or Turnstiles?

Active shooters are meticulous planners with an “MO” of going inside buildings to seek out targets. An effective strategy for commercial office buildings to mitigate the risk of penetration and mayhem is the effective deployment of security entrances. However, not all security entrances work the same way. Their different capabilities have an impact on an organization’s overall anti-tailgating strategy in terms of capital outlay, manpower needed, annual operating costs, ROI, user education and preparation, and, ultimately, how effective they are in preventing the tragedy an active shooter might wreak.

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